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Algunas de las mejores fotos del Instagram de National Geographic

Algunas de las mejores fotos del Instagram de National Geographic

- Por

Estas son solo algunas de las mejores fotos del Instagram de National Geographic pero evidentemente dejan ver todas las maravillas que un lente puede capturar los escenarios más espectaculares e increíbles, las personas y culturas más hermosas, lo animales más asombrosos y la vida en sí, es que sin duda NatGeo cumple un excelente trabajo documentando los rincones del mundo en que no todo tenemos acceso pero que si deseamos disfrutar de su majestuosidad, aprender a valorar nuestra fauna, flora y culturas que eso es lo que nos hace especiales. Al darle un vistazo a las fotos del Instagram de NatGeo nos damos cuenta de todo el talento que los seres humanos tenemos y que debe ser así, aprovecharlo con tanto respeto para mostrarle al resto del mundo lo asombroso que puede llegar a ser este planeta y que estamos llenos de regalos, desde el pétalo de una flor hasta la tierna mirada de un elefante son oportunidades para cambiar el modo de ver el día. A continuación te damos una probadita de lo que son las fotos del Instagram de National Geographic.

fotos del Instagram de National Geographic

Fuente

Las mejores fotos del Instagram de National Geographic

1. Una hermosa mirada expectante

2. Un abanico de plumas

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Photo by @CarltonWard // A white egret preens its breeding plumage in Everglades National Park, which was that starting point of the 2012 Florida Wildlife Corridor Expedition. Our team paddled, hiked and biked 1,000+ miles in 100 consecutive days, tracing the last remaining wildlife corridor still connecting the Everglades (southern tip of Florida) north to the Okefenokee Swamp (southern Georgia). Everglades wading bird populations have declined by more than 90 percent from their peak. Plume hunters aggressively killed wading birds in the late 1800s — as many as 5 million each year — primarily to provide feathers to decorate hats that were fashionable in America and Europe. Seeing birds hunted nearly to extinction galvanized the early environmental movement, including establishment of the modern National Audubon Society and President Roosevelt creating the first National Wildlife Refuge (Pelican Island) in 1903. Habitat loss for development and draining of wetlands have continued to challenge wading birds, but protecting more land and restoring the flow of the Everglades offers hope for recovery. My current #PathofthePanther project with @NatGeo is working to bring more attention to the Florida Wildlife Corridor through the story of the endangered Florida panther, because without protecting a wildlife corridor to the north, the panther will have no path to recovery. The clock is ticking as 1000 people move to Florida each day. Five million acres of the Corridor are projected to be lost by 2070 if development continues to sprawl on its current trajectory. Please connect with me @carltonward and please share this story so we can help save the #FloridaWildlifeCorridor. @fl_wildcorridor @insidenatgeo. #everglades #expedition #FloridaWild #KeepFLWild @audubonsociety @evergladesnps. Expedition team members: @joeguthrie8 @mallorydimmitt @filmnatureman.

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3. Los ojos más tiernos y el corazón más inocente

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Photo by @FransLanting Bonobos are the least known of all the great apes and eerily close to us. When one looks you in the eyes like this male did, the boundaries between us and them become blurry. I’m back in the Congo to explore the world of bonobos. We’ll be joined for an exciting expedition by @Ashley_Judd who is just as keen as @ChristineEckstrom and I are to elevate the profile of bonobos and to support the people who care about them. Go to @FransLanting to see one of my favorite new images of a bonobo waist deep in water made @Lolayabonobo. And follow us to get updates about our discoveries. @natgeocreative @thephotosociety @Bonobodotorg @Ashley_Judd @ChristineEckstrom #Bonobos #Apes #Empathy #Naturelovers #Explore

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4. Un perfecto espejo natural reflejando dos hermosos animales

5. Un enfoque diferente

6. Una rareza magistral

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Photograph by @paulnicklen // Meet the mysterious, elusive, shy, rarely seen, intelligent and vulnerable narwhal. A male narwhal rises from the icy seas of Lancaster sound. The most noticeable characteristic of the narwhal is the long tusk, which is a canine tooth that projects from the left side of the upper jaw, through the lip, and forms a left-handed helix spiral. Narwhals actually do not have any teeth inside of their mouths. A tusk grows throughout life, reaching a length of 5 to 10 feet. The one thing you need to remember about narwhal is that they primarily feed on polar cod and the polar cod life cycle is tied to sea ice. Without ice there will be catastrophic effects on all species. Some scientists say that the narwhal are just as vulnerable as the polar bear to climate change. #followme on @paulnicklen to learn and see more about the unicorn of the sea. #bethechange #nature #naturelovers #instagood #arctic #climatechangeisreal

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7. Mamá siempre será a quien querremos aferrarnos

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Photo by @BrianSkerry. Happy Mother’s Day! A manatee calf hitches a ride – piggy-back style – on it’s mom in the waters off the coast of Belize. While working on an @NatGeo story about the Mesoamerican Reef, I frequently went out early in the morning – using only a mask, snorkel and fins – to quietly search for wildlife. Manatees in this region are far less acclimated to humans than those in Florida, and can difficult to approach. They typically spend their nights within thick, protective mangroves, feeding on nearby seagrass beds during the day. All of these ecosystems are connected and conservation of the whole is vital since animals depend on each other for survival. This mom and calf were very tolerant of me, and allowed me into their world that morning. To see more underwater photos, and to learn more about my adventures around the world, follow me – @BrianSkerry – on Instagram. #natgeo #underwaterphoto #instagood#follow #underwaterphotography #manatee #cute #animals #animal #followme #photooftheday #photography#travelphoto #travel

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8. Un poco relajado para salir detrás de ti

9. Completamente sin palabras ante tanta hermosura

10. Una cueva como ninguna

11.Amor real

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Photo by @amivitale. At Reteti Elephant Sanctuary (@r.e.s.c.u.e) in Northern Kenya, Mary Lengees, one of Reteti's first female elephant keepers, caresses Suyian, the first resident. Suyian was rescued in September 2016 when she was just four weeks old. The Mathews Range, where the Namunyak Conservancy and @r.e.s.c.u.e are situated, is home to Africa's second-largest elephant population. Community-based Samburu wildlife keepers there are working to rehabilitate abandoned and orphaned elephants in order to eventually return them to the nearby wild herds. This elephant sanctuary is the culmination of a two-decades long process of tipping conservation upon its head, protecting wildlife for, and not just from, people. In that sense the sanctuary is as much about people as it’s about elephants. From April 30th, you can visit the sanctuary virtually through #MyAfrica, a VR experience I helped direct with the incredible @lupitanyongo as the voice over for @conservationorg, and honored to have learned from the brilliant @PassionPicturesFilms @[email protected] @waldo_etherington @3d_vision3 and @deep_vr which debuted at @tribeca Film Festival this past week. Learn more by following me @amivitale @r.e.s.c.u.e and @conservationorg #protectelephants #bekindtoelephants #DontLetThemDisappear @kenyawildlifeservice @nrt_kenya @thephotosociety @natgeo #elephants #saveelephants #stoppoaching #kenya #northernkenya #magicalkenya #whyilovekenya #africa #everydayafrica #photojournalism #amivitale

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12. Una fotografía merecedora de muchos reconocimientos

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Photo by @CristinaMittermeier // Enoughness is something I have been thinking about for a while as a way to enrich ourselves and create sustainable solutions for our planet. Spending time with Indigenous people has taught me that abundance is not measured in the things that we own, but in the strength of our human spirit, and in the depth of our connection to the natural world. From the Amazon to the Arctic, these communities nurture an intimate awareness of the web of relationships that have sustained them in harmony with nature, for millennia. For the Quechua people in the highlands of Peru, the llama is not a beast of burden, but a brother and a member of the family. Do you have a furry friend who belongs in this way to your family? To learn more about #Enoughness #Followme at @CristinaMittermeier #Amaze #Instagood #love #brothers #HappyEarthDay Inspired by @VincentJMusi

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13. Solo se puede decir INCREÍBLE

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Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) – This stalagmite found inside Lechuguilla (cave) in Carlsbad Caverns National Park has formed over hundreds of thousands of years as drip waters fall to the floor, de-gas carbon dioxide, and deposit calcium carbonate layer by layer. Later on, the chemistry of the drip waters has changed, and instead of calcium carbonate being deposited, it has been dissolved, revealing the internal structure of the stalagmite. The walls of the stalagmite have become so thin that it is possible to shine a light through them. One of the many fascinating formations from Lechuguilla, which is featured in the next episode (Genesis) of the Nat Geo Channels ‘One Strange Rock’. #OneStrangeRock @natgeocreative

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14. Una mirada muy coqueta

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Photo by @kirstenluce // Captured with Samsung Note 8, produced with @samsungmobileusa // Jasper is a Barred owl who was brought to the Adirondack Wildlife Refuge (@adk_wildlife) in Wilmington, NY after being hit by a car. Refuge intern Keith Ahrens (@keithahrens) says that litter along a roadway can attract rodents which then attracts owls and other birds of prey. This non-profit refuge takes in wild animals who are in need of a home and/or medical care. Whenever possible, the animals are rehabilitated and released. The refuge also currently provides a home for wolves, bears, bobcats, foxes, owls, hawks and other animals. The refuge, in upstate New York, is open to the public and accepts donations to help maintain their facilities and pay for medical care.

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15. La magia del cielo es infinita

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Photo by @renan_ozturk If you dream it, it will happen. Or something else totally unexpected and otherworldly! @hansjoergauer taking a night lap climbing on vertical glacier ice under the northern lights in iceland. ~ Although the impossibly steep ice climbing, northern lights and the presence of climate change were memorable on this trip, like most adventures the most lasting impressions had more to do with the people. In particular @camp4collective director/photographer @Timkemple had broken ankle pretty bad early on, but instead of calling it quits he kept a positive attitude and continued to shoot – by ice crutching around the glacier with a modified crampon-crutches, sleds, belly crawling and whatever means possible. @hansjoergauer @pfaff_anna @retro_outdoors @the_dunne @brandonjosephbaker @kakiorr ~ See @renan_ozturk for more from this exploration

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16. MAJESTUOSO y hermosamente imponente

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Photograph by @PaulNicklen // It is not an easy life for a young grizzly bear. They are constantly foraging on a diverse diet of vegetation, fish, carrion and other sources of nutrition until it is time to sleep for the winter. Even if it is October and -30c on the Fishing Branch River in Canada’s Yukon. Their key time to get fat is in the fall months when they target salmon. This forces these normally isolated nomads within proximity to one another. Young bears like this ice-covered female are always on the lookout for big lumbering males or protective mothers and cubs. The one skill they have is that they are light and fast and run they can. If you aren’t big and tough, then you better be alert and quick. #FollowMe on @PaulNicklen to see more of my favorite predators. #speed #bear #adventure #beauty #nature #naturelovers #grizzly

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17. Esta es la cara de quien no tiene miedo, de quien se siente seguro

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Photo by @FransLanting You are looking at a female bonobo. In the wake of International Women’s Day it is worth contemplating the different solutions to gender issues bonobos have evolved. Bonobos are our closest cousins on the tree of life along with chimpanzees, but among bonobos the status of females is much higher than it is among chimps—or in most human societies. The social rank of a male bonobo is derived from the status of his mother. The bond between mother and son is strong and lasts a lifetime. Among bonobos social conflicts are often resolved through sexual encounters instead of by aggression. There is a lot we do not understand yet about them, because they only occur in a remote part of the Congo Basin where they are difficult to study. But we do know enough to appreciate them as kindred beings for whom female cooperation rather than male competition is a way of life that has served them well. Not a bad model to consider as we are rethinking gender roles in our communities and how we cope with excess aggression. Learn more in “Bonobo, The Forgotten Ape,” a book I produced with primatologist and fellow Dutchman Frans de Waal. And follow me @FransLanting and @ChristineEckstrom for more stories from the world of nature. @thephotosociety #Bonobos #Chimps #Apes #InternationalWomensDay #IWD2018 #BonoboConservationInitiative #naturelovers #wisdom #harmony

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18. Viendo esta fotografía me siento en la prehistoria viendo un dinosaurio

19. Todo un carnaval de colores andante

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Photo by @CristinaMittermeier // As I have been editing images for a new book, I am entertaining myself with images of people wearing “interesting stuff on their head”. I photographed this child at a cultural festival in the highlands of New Guinea. I had to smile when I learned that instead of using the feathers of the endangered Birds of Paradise, this headdress was made out of coloured chicken feathers, which I thought was beautiful. To see more images of people wearing interesting things on their heads, #followme at @CristinaMittermeker #color #culture #hat #feather #tribe #people #indigenous @Oceania @NatGeoCreative @ThePhotoSociety #headgear #interestingstuff #stuffpeoplewearontheirhead #adventureroftheyear

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20. Una imagen que me lleva hasta mi total y tranquila paz interior

Ver estas fotos del Instagram de National Geographic me hace pensar cuan afortunados somos y las maravillas que nos rodean y muchas veces no tenemos la más mínima oportunidad de conocer, es un excelente trabajo el de estos fotógrafos, pues tienen la capacidad de llevar hasta los hogares cualquier lugar del mundo y sus maravillas.

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Fotografías tomadas: https://www.instagram.com/natgeo/?hl=es-la